Penn State University

CAMPUS LANDMARKS

Nittany Lion Shrine

Nittany Lion Shrine

Nittany Lion Shrine
Curtin Road at Burrowes Street
This sleek statue of a Nittany Lion was donated to PSU by the class of 1940, and was carved from a 13-ton block of Indiana limestone by Sculptor Heinze Warnecke in the summer of 1942. Easily one of the most photographed spots on campus, if you visit the statue on game day, be prepared to wait in line for your picture on the lion.

 

 

 

Old Main

Old Main

Old Main
Stand on East College Street at South Pugh. Through the entrance to the PSU campus, and up on the hill you will see Old Main, gazing down on the whole of campus. One of the most iconic buildings at Penn State University, the current structure was built in 1930 on the site of the original Main Building, which was built in 1863. That original building was constructed of Pennsylvania limestone, partially hauled by a mule named Old Coaly, whose bones are now preserved in the Hetzel Union Building. Some of these stones from the original building make up Old Main. In front of Old Main sits the preserved Old Main Bell, which once rung as a time keeper throughout campus in the original Main Building. Many important programs and events have taken place on the lawn in front of Old Main, including a visit from President Obama in March 2008 during his presidential campaign, drawing a crowd of over 20,000 people.

 

The Obelisk

The Obelisk

The Penn State Obelisk
While facing old Main, look left across the walkway leading towards College Avenue for the tall, pointy obelisk structure. The Penn State Obelisk consists of 281 blocks of building stone from 139 different localities, mostly in Pennsylvania, and its components are arranged to represent the geologic column of the rocks of Pennsylvania, with the oldest rocks at the bottom and the youngest at the top. These stones range from pre-Cambrian rocks, the oldest in the state, to the youngest Triassic rocks, which were formed during the age of the dinosaurs. Built in 1897, according to alumni, “legend has it that if a Freshman co-ed walks by the obelisk and it topples, she must be a virgin…it hasn’t toppled since!”

 

 

Pattee and Paterno Libraries

The Burrows Building of the Pattee and Paterno Libraries

Pattee and Paterno Libraries
The Pattee Library (at the north end of the Pattee Mall) was built in 1940 and was named for literature professor and novelist Fred Lewis Pattee. The Pattee Library houses the Arts & Humanities collections, including the unique “Fred Waring’s America” collection. The musical group the “Pennsylvanians” created music together and toured the world from 1917-1984. Pennsylvanians band-leader and proud PSU Alumnus, Fred Waring’s collection of the Pennsylvanians recordings, photographs, musical scores, scrapbooks and more are important as a resource for musical history. The Burrows Building, a wing of the Pattee Library, the structure was built in 1938 for the School of Education. It was named for Thomas Burrowes, president of the school from 1868 to 1871.

The Paterno Library (connected to the Pattee Library) was built in 2000 and was named after football coach Joe Paterno, whose generous donation funded the creation of the library. The Paterno Library houses the Business and Sciences collections, as well as the historical University archives. Call the main Libraries Phone for open hours: 814-865-6368

 

CarnegieBuildingPSU

Carnegie Building
photo courtesy of on-safari.blogspot.com

Carnegie Building
Home to the College of Communications, Carnegie Building originated as Penn State’s first freestanding library. It was built with a $150,000 gift from philanthropist, steel magnate and Penn State Board of Trustees member Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919). Carnegie Library, as it was first known, was completed in 1904, received an addition in 1921 and then a renovation in 1940 after the library moved to its current site.

 

 

 

Berkey Creamery

Berkey Creamery

The Berkey Creamery
119 Food Science Bldg.
University Park, PA  16802
Located in a corner of the Food Science Building on Curtin Road, the Creamery is a must-stop when visiting the PSU campus. The Creamery was first opened in 1865 inside the “College Barns” behind Old Main, along with a hayloft and a blacksmith. It was moved to the current location from next to Borland Laboratory in 2006 in order to accommodate the large crowds of visitors. No more than four days elapse from the time the cow is milked until the ice cream is made, so you know it’s as fresh as it can be. The 14.1% butterfat content contributes to its ultra-creamy texture (and to your waistline!). Peachy Paterno and Alumni Swirl are popular flavors-there is no mixing of flavors in one bowl or cone, so choose carefully! The Creamery is also known for being part of famous ice cream makers Ben and Jerry’s rise to fame! In 1977 the dynamic duo took a correspondence course offered by the Creamery and the rest, as they say, is history.  The Creamery gets its name thanks to a donation from the former local Berkey Milk Company.

 

Beaver Stadium

Beaver Stadium

Beaver Stadium
1 Beaver Stadium
University Park, PA 16802
Ticket Info: 1-800-NITTANY (1-800-648-8269)
Home to the Penn State Nittany Lions football team, Beaver Stadium was first built in 1909 near the Recreation Building, before being disassembled and reassembled in its current location in 1930. The stadium has expanded 7 times since opening at the current location, with the first expansion taking place in 1969 and the latest expansion taking place in 2001. With the latest expansion, the capacity was brought to 106,572, making it the second-largest stadium in the nation behind Michigan Stadium. The stadium is named for James Beaver, governor of Pennsylvania from 1887 to 1891, who was also the president of the school’s board of trustees.
2012-13 Football Schedule

 

Lasch Football Building Entrance
photo courtesy of theguyfromerie.com

Lasch Football Building
177 Creekside Drive
State College, PA 16801
Located about 3 miles northeast of Beaver Stadium, the Louis & Mildred Lasch Football Building houses indoor training and practice facilities, weight rooms, whirlpool therapy, video production rooms, player lounges and coaches offices. In the locker room of the Lasch Football Building sits a large white “S” against the blue locker room carpet. No one is permitted to step on it or set anything on it for any reason, including locker rooms guests (family, friends, media, etc). Whoever breaks the rule and is caught is sentenced to 10 push-ups by the player, coach or staff member that bears witness.

 

BryceJordanCenter

Bryce Jordan Center
photo courtesy of ticketini.com

The Bryce Jordan Center  
Curtin Road at University Drive
State College, PA16801
Ticket Info: 1-800-NITTANY (1-800-648-8269)
Home to the Penn State Nittany Lion men’s basketball and women’s basketball teams, the BJC has a capacity of 15,261. Built in 1995, it is the largest arena in Pennsylvania between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. In 2007 the BJC became home for THON weekend. In addition, it is host to concerts and graduation ceremonies, among other important shows and events.

 

 

Squirrell on Penn State Campus

Squirrel on Penn State Campus

Friendly Penn State Squirrels
Anyone who has ever set foot on the PSU campus surely has a story to tell about these overly amiable creatures. According to “This is Penn State,” the guidebook to all things blue and white, the school’s flourishing squirrel population had its humble beginnings as four pairs of gray squirrels purchased by the University in 1925 for a total of $32 and “planted” on campus.