The Ohio State University

CAMPUS LANDMARKS

 

The Oval

The Oval

The Oval
OSU’s central hub, The Oval is a large, grassy, tree-filled area ringed with some of the oldest buildings on campus. Notice “The Five Brothers,” a circle of five towering Oak trees commemorating the loss of five OSU students killed in battle during WWI. On warm days, you will find hoards of students sunning themselves, picnicking, playing Frisbee, and maybe even doing a little studying.

 

 

 

Thompson Library

West side of Thompson Library

The Thompson Library
1858 Neil Avenue Mall
Columbus, OH 43210

Crowning the east end of The Oval, you can browse the 5.8 million volumes of books in Thompson Library then ride to the 11th floor tower for a sweeping view of campus and downtown Columbus. For good luck on exams, students touch the head or nose of the bust of former university president William Oxley Thompson, located inside the lobby.

Mon.-Thur. 7:30am-12am; Fri. 7:30am-10pm; Sat. 8am-10pm; Sun. 11am-12am

 

Mirror Lake

Mirror Lake

South Oval and Mirror Lake
Just south of the main Oval is this tranquil park-like area.  Mirror Lake was originally spring-fed, with Browning Amphitheater sitting alongside it, hosting an array of outdoor concerts and plays throughout the spring, summer and fall.

 

 

 

 

Orton Hall

Orton Hall

Orton Hall
155 S Oval Mall
Columbus, OH 43210
 
Orton Hall was built in 1893 and was named for the university’s first president. Home to the campus chimes, first played on June 15, 1915, the Carillon housed in Orton Hall also houses a Carillon is played daily at noon and 5pm, ringing school songs across The Oval.

 

 

Wexner Center for the Arts

Wexner Center for the Arts

Wexner Center for the Arts
1871 N. High Street
Columbus, OH 43210
Located at the east end of The Oval, Wexner Center for the Arts is a unique architectural space, designed with a modern spin on the original armory that used to sit in the very same spot. The Wexner Center houses rotating, cutting-edge international art, film and theatre exhibits throughout the year. While there, be sure to check out Maya Lin’s Groundswell, a permanent outdoor piece consisting of 43 tons of shattered tempered glass from automobiles and representing the pre-historic burial grounds and rolling hills of southern Ohio.
Tue., Wed., Sun. 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat. 11am-8pm

 

Hayes Hall “Whispering Arches”

Hayes Hall
108 N Oval Mall
Columbus, OH 43210
Built in 1893, Hayes Hall was the first Ohio college building designed and used exclusively for manual, technical, and domestic instruction. Try out the “whispering arches”—stand with a friend on either side of the arches and whisper back and forth to see what happens!

 

 

 

 

 

Buckeye Grove

Buckeye Grove

Buckeye Grove
Outside the southwest corner of Ohio Stadium
In 1929, eleven Buckeye trees were planted in the Buckeye All-American Arbor at the northeast corner of 16th Avenue and Tuttle Park Place to represent the first starters of the Ohio State football team. Since 1934, a tree has been planted to honor each All-American football player, totaling over 130 trees. The Arbor, later renamed Buckeye Grove, was moved  across the street to the southeast side of Ohio Stadium in the 1960’s, and again to the southwest side of Ohio Stadium in 1997 where it sits today. Each tree is designated with a plaque denoting the honored player. The Grove is maintained by the student organization Ohio Staters, Inc.

 

 

Ohio Stadium

Ohio Stadium

Ohio Stadium
411 Woody Hayes Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Stadium Office: (614) 247-6713
Athletics Ticket Office: (614) 292-2624
Ohio Stadium Tours are scheduled Mon-Thurs between 9am-5pm. Call (614) 292-7687 to schedule at least 2 weeks in advance.
During the Chic Harley years (1916, ’17, 19), OSU’s first three-time All-American sent fans into a frenzy and football became Columbus’s number one pastime. Increased game attendance demanded a large facility, so Ohio Stadium was completed in 1922. The stadium was dedicated on October 21, 1922 during the game against Michigan in which OSU suffered 19-0 loss. To view an eternal reminder of the loss visit the Rotunda (north end, main gate of the stadium) and look up at the maize flowers against a blue background. Nicknamed “The Shoe” for its horseshoe shape, the original 66,000 seat stadium has been renovated numerous times, bringing the total capacity to around 105,000.  In 2001, permanent seating closed in the open end of the  horseshoe and in 2007 grass was replaced with Field Turf. Ohio Stadium was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. 2012-13 Football Schedule

 

St. John Arnea

St. John Arnea

St. John Arena
410 Woody Hayes Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Although not the most attractive building on campus, St. John Arena has been an athletics icon since it was built in 1956. From then until 1998, basketball games at St. John were loud and electric. All OSU fans who experienced basketball at St. John Arena will tell you that  there was nothing like it, and unfortunately these memories outshine the current environment at The Schott. Today, St. John Arena is still used for men’s volleyball, women’s volleyball, men’s gymnastics, women’s gymnastics, and wrestling, as well as the OSU Marching Band’s football pregame “Skull Session.”

 

Jesse Owens Statue
photo courtesy of buckeyeturf.osu.edu

Jesse Owens Statue
Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium
2450 Fred Taylor Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
In the spring of 2011, OSU unveiled the statue of Jesse Owens outside of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The statue depicts Owen clutching his four gold medals won at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Buckeye Jesse Owens traveled to the 1936 Berlin Olympics at a time of extreme racism and segregation in Nazi Germany, when Hitler believed that the games would prove his belief that the “Aryan” people were a dominant race. Owens proved that theory incorrect by winning four gold medals, making him the first American in Track & Field history to win four gold medals in a single game. Men’s Track & Field; Women’s Track & Field

 

 

 

Underground Railroad Marker

Underground Railroad Marker

Underground Railroad
Look for the five markers on campus that mark the path of the Underground Railroad that passed through campus in the mid-1800s. They are located by the Olentangy River, the RPAC field, Mirror Lake, near Enarson Hall and on the South Oval by College Road.