University of Nebraska-Lincoln

CAMPUS LANDMARKS

Old Iron Gates & Columns

Old Iron Gates & Columns

Old Iron Gates & Columns
Outside North East Corner of Memorial Stadium
The old iron gates served as the main entrance to campus from 1892 to 1922. In 1892, UNL was surrounded by an iron fence to encompass the University and prevent cows from wandering onto main campus.  The fence was removed in 1922, but the gates remained and were moved around campus for decades until they were finally restored and placed at the northeast side of Memorial Stadium, marking the entrance to a row of free-standing columns. The columns arrived on campus in 1930. Originally part of the Burlington train station in Omaha, the columns were purchased by UNL when the station began a remodel. Morrill Hall Director Erwin Barbour and George Seymour, a one-time regent and university campus committee member, bargained for UNL’s purchase of 28 columns for $5,000. The columns were originally meant to line the walkway from the Sheldon Art Gallery to Memorial Stadium; however, this plan was never executed, and the columns were placed at their current location at the northeast corner of Memorial Stadium. According to legend, if a girl graduates from UNL without being kissed during her college years, then a column will crumble.

 

Love Library

Love Library

Love Library
13th & ‘R’ Streets
Lincoln, NE 68588
Love Library was constructed between 1941-1943 initially as living space for cadets in the Army Specialized Training program. In the fall of 1945 the library opened to students, who were “surrounded” by thousands of volumes to which they had direct access in the large reading rooms-a revolutionary library design at the time. The main entrance on the north was characterized by a series of squared pillars surrounding the entry doors. The south façade was enhanced by expansive rose gardens. By 1960, the collections had outgrown the building, forcing an addition on the north side and altering the beautiful entry. However, Love Library’s distinctive Revolutionary War-type Georgian design white cupola has become an icon, soaring over the downtown Lincoln campus.

Broyhill Fountain

Broyhill Fountain

Broyhill Fountain
UNL City Campus Union Plaza
1400 R St 14th & R
Lincoln, NE 68508

Broyhill Fountain was built in 1999 and replaced the original Broyhill Fountain which existed in the same spot from 1970 to 1996. The fountain was removed and reconstructed due to the expansion of the UNL Union. Constructed as a place for students to congregate, the fountain was also commemorated to honor the memory of a student who had tragically passed away in 1966, Lynn Diann Broyhill. Jets spray water into the air above the large rocks that jut out of the fountain. The fountain also becomes illuminated at night.

 

Mueller Tower

Mueller Tower

Mueller Tower
Mueller Tower Plaza
Between Bessey Hall & Morrill Hall, 14th & Vine Street
A gift from Ralph Meuller, a 1898 UNL grad, Mueller Tower was dedicated in 1949. UNL Chancellor Burnett had greatly desired a bell tower, but was unable to fulfill that wish for UNL due to the Great Depression. Following WWII, Carillon Towers gained popularity as returning soldiers brought the custom to the US from Europe. However, Meuller’s tower was not a traditional tower; it contained modernized bells-electronically struck, finely tuned rods of varying lengths. The rods could be operated from a keyboard, and the sound was carried through an amplification system that carried up to 15 miles. The tower was designed via a design competition amongst UNL architectural students, and although Mueller was disappointed that none of the students had produced a tower “in the shape of an ear of corn,” he chose the design by George Kuska, which contained a corn motif at the top.
84 feet tall and octagonal in shape, the tower plays a variety of tunes at 25 minutes past each hour. The tower now contains a CD player in place of the rods.

 

Architecture Hall

Architecture Hall

Architecture Hall
133 Architecture Hall
Lincoln, NE 68508

Located on the west side of campus, Architecture Hall, at over 100 years old, is the oldest building on campus. Home to the university’s architecture program, Architecture Hall also houses gallery exhibits open to the public and is the home to the largest urinal west of the Mississippi!
Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm

 

 

 

Archie the Mammoth

Archie the Mammoth

Archie the Mammoth
Morrill Hall, south of 14th and Vine Street
Lincoln, NE 68588

Considered by some to be the mascot of UNL’s natural science department, this giant bronze mammoth greets visitors as they climb the steps of Morrill Hall. Nicknamed “Archie” (short for Archidiskidon imperator maibeni, the Imperial Mammoth’s scientific name), students will often come up and hi-five his outstretched foot for good luck. Of course, this bronze statue is not the real Archie. The real one resides in the museum’s Elephant Hall.

 

 

"Torn Notebook"

“Torn Notebook”

Sculpture Garden
12th and Q Streets, adjacent to Sheldon Museum of Art
The UNL Sheldon Museum of Art Sculpture Garden is a “historical representation of sculpture from the early 20th century to the present.” The garden, dedicated in 1970, originally occupied 2.5 acres adjacent to the Sheldon Museum of Art but has expanded beyond to incorporate sculptures around campus. Sculptures include “Torn Notebook” (1995) by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, stainless steel & aluminum giant notebook pages that appear to be blowing in the wind; “Old Glory” (1986), a giant red painted steel beam sculpture representing brushstrokes; “Greenpoint” (1988), two industrially-fabricated leaning sheets of steel that frame the Mueller Tower from afar. A podcast tour of the Sculpture Garden is available here.

 

Bob Devaney Sports Center

Bob Devaney Sports Center

Bob Devaney Sports Center
1600 Court Street
Lincoln, NE
68508
Ticket Info: (800) 8-BIGRED
The 13,595-seat arena is home to Cornhusker men’s basketball and women’s basketball. The Husker Hall of Fame and the Husker Walk of Fame display over 100 years of excellence in Nebraska athletics, while the Hydraulic banked track is one of the finest and fastest indoor facilities in the world. Call (402) 472-3333 for guided tours. Open daily 8am-8pm

 

 

Memorial Stadium

Memorial Stadium

University of Nebraska Memorial Stadium
10th St. and Stadium Drive
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588
402) 472-3333
Ticket Info: (800) 8-BIGRED
Since 1923, Memorial Stadium has been the home of University of Nebraka-Lincoln’s football team, the Huskers. Memorial Stadium, named to honor all Nebraskans who served in the Nation’s wars (check out the inscriptions on the four corners of the stadium), is also known as a “Cathedral of College Football.” With a current capacity of 81,067, the historic stadium also possesses one of the largest replay screens in the nation.
Self guided tours are available daily 8am-8pm, with limited field access, at Gate 24 (when no teams are practicing). Download a walking tour brochure online, or pick one up at Gate 20.
Husker Football Schedule

 

Husker Legacy Statue. Photo courtesy of wikipedia.org.

Husker Legacy Statue & Tom Osborne Statue
For the football fanatics, be sure to have your picture taken with these two statues when exploring Memorial Stadium. The Husker Legacy Statue sits at the Northwest corner of Memorial Stadium. Created in 1995, the statue depicts six Blackshirts players tackling a Kansas State player. On the North side of Memorial Stadium is a statue of Tom Osborne, former Huskers coach and now Athletic Director. The statue, erected in 2006, shows Osborne next to quarterback Brook Berringer.

 

 


Perin Porch

Perin Porch
photo courtesy of unl.edu

Perin Porch
East Campus
In 1875, “farm campus” superintendent S.W. Perin moved into a white frame house on campus with an inviting porch, originally built as a dormitory for the small amount of students enrolled in the college. Perin and his family would invite agriculture students to gather, socialize and study on the porch. More than a hundred years later, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Botanical Garden and Arboretum constructed a replica of the porch. Today, students and visitors can still relax on the “Perin Porch,” surrounded by flowers, vines and plants.